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Be True to Your Own Dreams

Here is an excerpt from my book, SEVEN STEPS TO INNER POWER, where I discuss being true to your own dreams:

When you hear the word loyalty, you may think of it as a vague, faraway quality.  It’s not.  Loyalty as a step to inner power involves taking specific actions toward your personal goals, your purpose, your target.  So many of us make new year’s resolutions – “I want to eat better and lose weight,” ” I want to exercise,” “I want to look for a better job,” “I want to meditate every day.”  How often does our resolve usually last?  A few days or maybe a couple of weeks?

Why is it that we give up so easily even though these resolutions represent key stepping-stones to our well-being or to accomplishing our cherished dreams?  One reason is that the actions we need to take can feel uncomfortable.  It’s easier to continue in our old, comfortable way of doing things that to exert the effort to create significant change.  Another reason it’s easy to give up is that loyalty requires consistent self-discipline – the discipline that allows you to remain committed to two things:  yourself and your journey.

You will find that when you start living as one with your Silent Master and commit to worthy goals, all kinds of distractions and new challenges will arise to test your commitment.  In fact, the greater your achievement, the greater the tests that come.  Only if you love yourself enough to remain totally disciplined and loyal to yourself can you triumph over these obstacles and challenges.

Visit me online at my school, Jung SuWon or on Goodreads

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The Creative Power of Your Words

Here is an excerpt from my book, SEVEN STEPS TO INNER POWER, where I discuss the creative power of your words:

Tae Yun Kim

When you have let go of negative emotions during your shower meditation and are making your first impressions on the new day, be sure to use positive affirmations.  Let your inner and outer dialogue with yourself be filled with positive declarations about your true self.  Instead of saying, “I am not sad,” be sure to affirm positives such as “I am full of the confidence and natural joy of my real self.”

Tae Yun Kim

It’s always important to consider the way we communicate and the words we use, whether in daily life, in our meditations or in our inner dialogue  One of the most powerful avenues of expression your mind uses is your words.  Consider for a moment how you think.  Don’t you generally “hear” yourself think?  You express your ideas in words, words that either play in your mind or words you speak out loud.

Tae Yun Kim

Words have great creative power.  Your words can tear someone down or inspire them to be a hero.  Your words can spur someone to greater achievements or get them fired.  Since words are the creative carriers of your mental energy, treat them with great respect and choose them carefully with all your heart.  Be conscious of what you are saying.  If you have to, pause before you speak.  Careful means “full of care.”  I encourage you to send your words out with extreme care because with those words you can start World War III in your relationships.  We’ve all had the experience of saying something we didn’t mean and finding that the words, once released, go right ahead and have an effect, maybe one we didn’t intend.

Tae Yun Kim

It’s not so much the word itself that has an effect but the energy and vibration the word carries as you say it – your intent.  The energy and intent you put behind your words makes all the difference.  So when you’re speaking to others as well as to yourself, examine what energy you are letting your words carry.  Are you building up your ego in a selfish way that hurts others are are you boosting another’s self-image?  If a woman keeps telling her husband how stupid he is, he can start to believe that and decide that “if I can’t do anything right, why bother trying at all?”  In your dialogue with others and in your own inner dialogue, constantly reflect on whether you are paralyzing yourself and others or whether you are elevating yourself and others.

Tae Yun Kim

Visit me online at my school, Jung SuWon or on Goodreads

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Practicing Creative and Focused Visualization

Here is an excerpt from my book, SEVEN STEPS TO INNER POWER, where I discuss how to practice creative and focused visualiation: 

Creative visualization is much more than dreaming.  It is focused imagining, with the power of your will and persistence behind it.  It is an immaterial activity that takes form first as a mental image, then as a material image.

Tae Yun Kim

When you are practicing disciplined, determined, and creative visualization, you are engaging what I call your “future memory.”  Having a future memory of something is more than having a vision or goal.  It is holding that vision with unwavering certainty.  You are not 100 percent certain but 110 percent certain that your goal will become reality, because you’ve already experienced it as such.  You’ve already planned it out and, in your future memory, you’ve already experienced it taking place.  Now you are following through on the natural steps that will make this “memory” a reality.  You “remember” your goal with the same vivid and sensory detail that you remember your first kiss.  It is that real.

Tae Yun Kim

Making your goal a reality will take effort and discipline.  I like to give the classic example of athletes who are preparing to compete in the Olympics.  They have to be disciplined and they have to practice if they want to qualify.  Likewise, you won’t reach your goal with the snap of the finger or by ordering it for instant delivery from Amazon or eBay.  It will take work and commitment.  You have to approach your goals as if reaching them were a life-and-death matter.  You have to be honest with yourself, evaluate the effort you are putting forth, and ask yourself, “Did I put in 110 percent effort today or only 30 percent effort?”

Tae Yun KimOne of the things that helps you stay committed is that when something is part of your “future memory,” you have no doubts at all about ultimately achieving it.  How many times have you heard athletes say that they knew from the time they were children that they would be top competitors in their sport, whether it’s a great gymnast, a tennis champion, or an Olympic gold medalist swimmer?  When they were children, they already knew that they were meant to become and they practiced and perfected their skills to get there.

Tae Yun Kim

Visit me online at my school, Jung SuWon or on Goodreads

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Be Objective and Not Critical

Here is an excerpt from my book, SEVEN STEPS TO INNER POWER, where I discuss how to assess strengths and weaknesses: 

Tae Yun Kim

When assessing your strengths and weaknesses, be careful to be objective and not critical.  If you were given a bag filled with both real and synthetic diamonds and were told to separate out the real ones, your first task would be to gain complete knowledge of the qualities of the real diamonds as well as the characteristics of the synthetic ones.  As you went about the task of separating the real ones from the synthetic ones, you wouldn’t impose emotional value judgments on either kind of diamond. You wouldn’t say, “This wonderful, beautiful, real diamond goes in this pile,” and “This disgusting, terrible, phony synthetic one goes in that pile.” No, it would be an objective, clinical undertaking designed only to create a group of real diamonds.

Tae Yun Kim

Here’s another example.  When a surgeon operates on a patient, he cannot be afraid of the amount of blood the procedure will produce or hesitate to use his knife and cut through tissue. His objective is to reach the malignancy or make the adjustment that will help his patient become well again. Let’s take this hypothetical example one step further. Imagine that you are in a situation where you are not only the surgeon but also the patient. Of course that is scary.  Yet you must have the courage to “operate” on yourself with the same objectivity you would use with your patients if you wish to rid yourself of what may be life-threatening.

Tae Yun Kim

Now apply this analogy to your own life.  I’m not talking about performing real surgery on your body but looking clinically at your strengths and weaknesses and deciding where you must perform “surgery” on your character or your habits.  Maybe what is really holding you back and needs to be surgically removed is the habit of drinking too much alcohol or eating too many sweets or constantly criticizing yourself or others.  Remember that you don’t need to make value judgments about yourself when identifying your fears, weaknesses, or strengths.  When you discover that you have certain strengths, determine to keep them, but do not become overly confident or egotistical.  When you find your weaknesses, determine to eliminate them, but do not fall into a mire of depression, dejection, or self-condemnation.  All of us have weaknesses.

Tae Yun Kim

Visit me online at my school, Jung SuWon or on Goodreads